Nuovo cinema Paradiso (1988)

 


 

A celebration of youth, friendship, and the everlasting magic of the movies.

A filmmaker recalls his childhood, when he fell in love with the movies at his village\’s theater and formed a deep friendship with the theater\’s projectionist. Full summary »

Genre: Comedy,Drama,Romance

Nuovo cinema Paradiso (1988)
   
Release Date: 23 February 1990 (USA)
Country: Italy , France
Director: Giuseppe Tornatore
Cast:
  • Antonella Attili
  • Enzo Cannavale
  • Isa Danieli
  • Leo Gullotta
  • Marco Leonardi
  • Pupella Maggio
  • Agnese Nano
  • Leopoldo Trieste
  • Salvatore Cascio
  • Tano Cimarosa
  • Nicola Di Pinto
  • Roberta Lena
  • Nino Terzo
  • Jacques Perrin
  • Philippe Noiret


33 Responses to Nuovo cinema Paradiso (1988)

  1. davidgoesboating
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    I’ve just watched Cinema Paradiso, and I’m amazed that it is held in such universal regard.

    Yes, it was a good film. It kept me very interested for the first half, and had several good moments. I loved the character of the priest, and Toto as a young kid also.

    HOWEVER… the last hour was some of the worst cinema I’ve seen in a long time. It was simply painful to watch. Hollywood sappy sentimentality mixed with an indulgent homage to the film itself. Not only was the ending poor, it showed up a major flaw in the movie… that the storyline didn’t really have any purpose. The film started out as a really enjoyable homage to movies, halfway through became a teenage love story, and then ended up as a sort of character piece. It was a shame especially because Cinema Paradiso had so much potential… there were plenty of good scenes early on, and if they had downplayed the sentimentality a bit, it would have been quite moving.

    It’s not the first time I’ve watched a film that looked like it was going to be really good but turned out disappointing, it just surprises me that apparently the only people who don’t love this film are trolls. Surely there are other serious film viewers out there who share my disappointment in this movie.

  2. happyhours
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    international or director’s cut?

    or the 155 min version?

  3. futurebondgirl29
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    by the end of the movie i was a legit mess! was anyone else as moved by this movie?

    Dreadhead #?????

    I just learned My Belle was French.

  4. hyyper
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    Everyone knows the imdb recommend movies is not that reliable.

    What are some similar movies to this classic? I love how it touches on innocence and love.

  5. prohibited-name-1524
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    I watched both versions and to me the original was way much better. The story kept simple but misterious because a lot of thing happened thar are left to our imagination.

    The director’s cut damage the ideal thought of what happened to Elena. She marries Toto’s friend, that was dissapointing.

    I prefer not knowing every little detail and just think that Elena and Toto’s relationship is the typical love story in real life for thousands of people. Your love from teenage years is never forgotten but it’s very difficult to keep forever. People grow up, change and move on with their lifes leaving towns, cities and even countries, but their nostalgic stories are always there to remind them they’ve changed for better or for worse.

    That’s my opinion. Now, want to read yours too.

  6. Dawn_Giacchino
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    The love theme is marvelous. I mean it can make me weep, its just so amazingly sentimental and tear-jerking and I mean it as a sincere compliment.

    Beautiful beautiful piece of music that I just love to listen to and sometimes play on the piano.

    But whenever I play the theme full blast on my system, I have to think of some other things or some imaginary love stories to drum up the emotion. The love story in the movie is just so pale and lifeless not memorable at all. The movie is very good but more memorable for the relationship between Toto and Alfredo.

    Does anybody else feel that this beautiful love theme needed a better love story to do it justice?

    Its just so unimaginably gorgeous.

    Best 100-Greatest-Films-List:

    http://www.theyshootpictures.com/gf1000_all1000films.htm

  7. btop
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    I’m interested in knowing every single one. I’ve made it my life quest to watch all those movies.

    Listen, I’ll talk. I’ll talk so much it’ll make your hair curl.

    Katharine Hepburn

  8. Rupert__Pupkin
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    1) The couple having sex in the crowded movie theater (what was the point of this?)

    2) The topless actress in the film clip montage at the end. I was surprised that they had nudity in mainstream films back in the 50s. Does anyone know what movie this is from and the name of the portrayed actress? Thanks.

  9. LimeH2O
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    What movie are they watching when everyone in theater is crying?



    i’m proud to admit to never have watched a "reality" tv program!

  10. heartcurrent
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    along with Wings of Desire

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tx6lsNcDHRA

  11. henrik-1988
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    please recommend? tell me…:)

  12. ramo18us
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    i loved this movie and i am curious if there are any movies like this one. thx

  13. ediazleo
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    The Best picture i’ve ever seen.

  14. Rupert__Pupkin
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    This movie was a cheap attempt to pull at our heart strings and make us feel emotional and gushy. The movie’s sole effort was to make everyone cry. The writing was poor, and the plot was just a series of meandering events that made little to no sense, but were written with the intention of making the audience teary-eyed. Here are some examples:

    1) Toto went more than 30 years without contacting his mother or sister. Why? Apparently, he abandoned his family because he made a promise to Alfredo to never come back to his hometown. Shame on Alfredo for asking the boy to make such a promise. And shame on Toto for thinking their was any nobility in cutting off ties with one’s family. Toto’s mother raised him the best she could, and you could tell that she genuinely loved him. It was despicable that Toto would abandon his family for so long. I get that Alfredo told him to never come back, but why couldn’t Toto pick up the phone? Or write a letter? If Alfredo didn’t die, Toto never would have come back. This forced absence didn’t make sense, and it was obvious that it was written into the movie to set up Toto’s "emotional" return.

    2) I get that Alfredo wanted Toto to be successful, but his desperate pleading and begging for Toto to never come back was way over the top. He was gritting his teeth and shaking the boy and cue music for the big hug. This was so unrealistic. A lot of people go to college, make careers for themselves, become financially independent, and STILL manage to call mom on the weekends and (GASP!) go home for the holidays.

    3) When Toto came back after 30 years, his mother wasn’t even upset that her son didn’t so much as write. What mother wouldn’t express some sort of sadness or grief over her son’s long-time absense? Toto offered up a half-ass apology for being out of touch for a third of a century, which proves that he’s such a gosh darn great guy, right? This was silly and unrealistic, written only to make us feel gushy.

    4) There is no way that Alfredo lived 30 more years. When we see Alfredo in the 1950s, he is an old blind man that has difficulty getting out of bed. He talks about being old and his life coming to an end. But then he lives another 3 decades. Huh? Again, this was done to set up Toto’s "emotional" return. Had Alfredo died 1 year after Toto left town (which would have been much more probable), Toto’s return would have been far less "emotional."

    5) The scene where Alfredo was burned was ridiculous. How did he get unconscious? Smoke inhalation takes a few minutes, and the room Alfredo was in had lots of open windows and was not that smokey, as shown when Toto came in to rescue him. And how did his eyes burn but his moustache and eyebrows not burn? Ridiculous. His face was pretty much left untouched, except for his eyeballs. Why did he go blind? Answer: Blind people are very sympathetic and can make audiences tearful.

    6) The love story was silly and forced. The woman’s character was not developed at all, and there was no feeling of chemistry between the two characters. Toto fell in love before he even spoke to her. So why set up a forced, dull, but ultimately tragic romance? Answer: It makes people cry. Bingo!

    The movie was very slow. It started off with some promise, but then it just didn’t go anywhere. After about an hour of watching a little boy antagonize an old man at a movie theater, the director realized he had no plot, so he threw in a predictable love story to take up the other half of the movie. The last 30 minutes of the movie consisted of almost no dialogue and just a series of pained facial expressions from people I didn’t care about.

    Big loser of a movie. Just a pathetic ploy to tug at people’s emotions. The people who cried at this are the same people that cry at long-distance phone commercials.

  15. guitardude459
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    I heard of this movie through being a massive fan of Ennio Morricone’s work. I recently bought the deluxe edition with both the director and theatrical cut. I was wondering which one you guys recommend i watch, and is it worth seeing the theatrical cut if you’ve seen the directors?

  16. jaytee2000
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    you should seriously question the level of your

    humanity…..or to put it more bluntly, the lack of it.

  17. DoctorJA
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    OK everybody:

    Let’s play a little game: vote for your favorite version and tell why you chose it. Keep a running tally.

    I go first. I saw the Original first and fell in love with it. I am Italian-American and have been to Italy many times: the movie captures the Italian spirit perfectly: passionate, a bit frenzied, and deeply romantic. Takes one to know one.

    Anyway, the Director’s cut was to me better because it showed Toto as the person we always thought he was. The scene in the car between him and Elena is the most moving 10 minutes of film ever made. The Director’s cut made the whole movie more complete.

    Director’s Cut-1

    Original-0

    (P.S. Gotta give a shout out to Steffan who started a similar thread on the "Amadeus" imdb page. Tom Hulce vs. F Murray Abraham: first to 100 votes wins.)

  18. yap613
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    Just wondering, why is this billed as comedy on IMDB? I watched it and found it to be a very good nostalgic drama/romance, but comedy? Can anyone explain?

  19. Julian-Hss
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    Oh, ma chere Kristelle, comme tu es belle.

    Je suis fou de toi.

    Belle creature que tu es.

    Joyeux anniverssaire ma petite Kayz.

    "Decider! we need a decision!"

  20. smoky_circles
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    What’s that movie — it’s the first one shown after Toto takes over being a projectionist and the first time kissing is shown in the cinema.

    It has a woman lying on a bed, a man comes and kisses her on her shoulder, then they kiss. Everyone applauds the kissing. Any clue?

  21. warrel
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    I am bored of lists that include only American(and,furthermore mostly new ones) films and ignore so many masterpieces,so I decide to make another poll,which I think will be more serious,will include most of the great movies(especially the foreign ones) and will be more representitive of the history of cinema.So,if you want to see that list(maybe it will be a top 100)post your top 10 in one of my topics.I’ll start with mine:

    1.Goodfellas(1990,Martin Scorsese)

    2.Stalker(1979,Andrei Tarkovsky)

    3.Raging Bull(1980,Martin Scorsese)

    4.Once Upon a Time in the West(1968,Sergio Leone)

    5.Harakiri(1962,Masaki Kobayashi)

    6.Persona(1966,Ingmar Bergman)

    7.Lawrence of Arabia(1962,David Lean)

    8.Bicycle Thieves(1948,Vitorio De Sicca)

    9.The Godfather(1972,Francis Ford Coppola)

    10.2046(2004,Wong Kar-Wai)

    I hope that a lot of people will join my poll!

  22. guitardude459
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    I am looking for the sheet music for the title theme and the love theme, i have the piano part, but i would really like the full orchestral score. If anyone knows where i could find it, or a could source for scores i’d appreciate it!

  23. johnnysam2
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    …although it is just my opinion, the ending of this movie is just pure magic. No matter hoe many times I view the dvd, I well up and cry like I’m watching it for the first time. The sheer beauty and joy, bringing the story full circle! Simply put, a masterpiece.

  24. mtupper1
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    I completely understand Alfredo’s advice given Toto as far as leaving town. Alfredo was well within his rights to tell young Toto to leave and not come back. The bigger world was out there and Toto was given some insight and exposure to develop that sidfe of a life. I do not agree with Alfredo’s maniulation of Toto’s life with regards to Elena! Alfredo betrayed his favorite soul in the world on the judgement that he would create beautiful art in the form of films. His intuition was correct and Toto did ultimately go onto great things, but it was not Alfredo’s position to do that! Toto had a passionate and deep love for Elena and led a life of shallow and insignificant relationships with no children. His films were his only creations. I really despise Alfredo for his destruction of Toto’s opportunity for a life of his own design. The true harm and repercussiona are realized on the night in the future when Toto and Elena are reunited and their love is still ardent after all that time.

    Moreover, the film puts Alfredo on pedastal in the end of the movie with the freeze frame of him at the credits. That is not fair. Alfredo was an anti-hero. The ends do not justify the means. Toto’s destiny was his own to choose.

  25. yodavid-1
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    What do you think of this scene?

    How do you understand it?

  26. gualesca
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    What is the director trying to show in the scene where Boccio is at the black board trying to answer 5×5? We are (heatedly)debating whether he is showing;

    a)Boccio antagonizing the teacher by not getting the right answer and therefore getting a rise out of the class based on the director showcasing youth as pranksters or,

    b)Boccio not knowing the answer genuinely and answering Christmas because he is not smart enough to understand the reference of Christmas falling on the 25th, the answer, based on the director showing him as being slow and ultimately not as worthy of the girl as Toto.

  27. Disco_Stu541
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    I just watched this movie for a class, and I loved it, in particular the score—I’m a big Morricone fan and I found during the movie that the score alone could drive me to tears. We talked about it in class today and our professor said something along the lines of, "Don’t get me wrong. The score is great—it’s Morricone. But it’s too invasive in the film; it tells you when to laugh and it tells you when to cry."

    Thinking about what he said now I’m starting to agree. There were several parts in the movie where the music alone was driving me emotionally. I’m still not sure if I’d classify this as ‘invasive,’ though. Is it possible for a score to be so present in a film that it detracts from the film itself? I hadn’t even thought about it after watching the movie, but the more I think about it the more I realize the music might, at times, be more powerful than the movie (this of course is my opinion, and I’m sure it might come under fire).

  28. TravisBickle17
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    i sure as hell did. this is the only movie i have ever cried watching. it got to me that way because of how much i can relate to the story and the whole thing in its entirety. not too many of my fellow film friends have seen this brilliant work of art, which is sad, but there is always a chunk of my heart that cherishes this film dearly. yea…yea…so i tear every time i watch this movie, so what?

    anyone else get the same way?

  29. Anonymous
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  30. Billy1212
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    Odd looking little Italian children grow up to be beautiful, male model looking teens? That’ll teach ME to be French!

    Prettiest dude I’ve seen right after the guy is Stargate……Yikes!

    So at a knock, I emptied my cage, to hide in the world…and alter with age

  31. my-name-isobel
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    The score makes the ending all the more glorious. It never fails to bring me to tears.

    "It’s better to help people than garden gnomes."

  32. mual1977
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    Yes, I know that these two movies are different, but I just can’t help comparing them. I always feel that Cinema Paradiso is getting way too much recognition compared to Amarcord. It’s been a while since I’ve watched Cinema Paradiso, but for some reason, this film didn’t move me at all. Amarcord, on the other hand, is stuck on my mind. It’s definitely one of my favourite movies, and I think it’s obvious that Tornatore was stealing from Fellini (to some extent), especially the description of youth and sexual desire etc. Though, Amarcord is set in Northern Italy and Cinema Paradiso describes Sicily.

    Amarcord won Oscars as well (and many other prizes), but it never had the same appeal as Cinema Paradiso. I think it’s so unjust.

  33. Anonymous
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