Rio Grande (1950)

 


 

THE BREATHTAKING SAGA OF THE UNITED STATES CAVALRY! (original print ad – all caps) See »

Rio Grande takes place after the Civil War when the Union turned their attention towards the Apaches. Union officer Kirby Yorke is in charge of an outpost on the Rio Grande in which he is in charge of training of new recruits one of which is his son whom he hasn\’t seen in 15 years. He whips him into shape to take on the Apaches but not before his mother shows up to take him out of there.The decision to leave is left up to Trooper Yorke who decides to stay and fight. Through it all Kirby and Kathleen though separated for years fall back into love and decide that it\’s time to give it another try. But Yorke faces his toughest battle when his unorthodox plan to outwit the elusive Apaches leads to possible court- martial. Locked in a bloody Indian war, he must fight to redeem his honor and save the love and lives of his broken family

Written by
Christopher D. Ryan <[email protected]>

Genre: Romance,Western

Rio Grande (1950)
   
Release Date: 15 November 1950 (USA)
Country: USA
Director: John Ford
Cast:
  • John Wayne
  • Maureen O'Hara
  • Ben Johnson
  • Claude Jarman Jr.
  • Harry Carey Jr.
  • Chill Wills
  • J. Carrol Naish
  • Victor McLaglen
  • Grant Withers
  • Sons of the Pioneers
  • Peter Ortiz
  • Steve Pendleton
  • Karolyn Grimes
  • Alberto Morin
  • Stan Jones


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34 Responses to Rio Grande (1950)

  1. lostinaction
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    In a scene you see young recruits riding horses like the romans.On 2 horses without saddles. Is this historical accurate, the romans were riding like this?

    Had the soldiers in the US Cavalry really to learn such a thing? By the way it looks dangerous(poor actors or stuntmen).

  2. Clive-Candy
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    I love millions of westerns but why for the love of god dont sing its a major turn off if your trying to impress mates with these great films.

  3. myvarinka
    Warning: printf(): Too few arguments in /home/themovie/public_html/wp-content/themes/feed-me-seymour/functions.php on line 694

    Does anyone know the complete lyrics to the Dale Evans song "Aha, San Antone" that Claude Jarman, Ben Johnson, Harry Carey Jr, and Ken Curtis were singing together in the tent?

    • R. Rogers
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      Lot O’ Luck. The closest you can probably get..is listening to Rosalie Allens’s (early 50’s?) version on YouTube. It’s not the crispest sound…but she does fill-in some of the omissions of SheWoreAYellowribbon version.
      Dusty&Cheryl, for whatever reason..are very protective about (these particular)lyrics being published on the internet.

  4. avarco
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    Hoping someone can clear this up for me:

    At the end of She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, Ben Johnson’s character Trooper Travis Tyree had only two weeks until he got out of the cavalry, but he’s in this movie. I understand that John Wayne played two different characters, but I’m assuming Travis Tyree is the same guy as they have the same name. Does She Wore a Yellow Ribbon take place before Rio Grande?

  5. tomcat69w
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    It seems odd to find out in the trivia section that this movie was originally titled Rio Bravo,…which DID become the title of a 1959 John Wayne movie also a classic. Funny how titles get thrown around in hollywood.

    The Smoker You Drink, The Player You Get!

  6. JMPomfret
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    I enjoy Wayne’s ability to project tough leadership to his men, but to show the audience his concern about Jeff’s well being. He’s visibly scared when Jeff rides "Roman style", wants to break up the fight between Jeff and Heinz but can’t because he respects the "soldier’s fight" tradition, secretly looks in on Jeff in the hospital and smiles when he realized his son is earning his stripes, and other gestures. He must remain outwardly tough to the troops, but still feels tenderness to his estranged son Remeber how he checks Jeff’s height against his own on the tent during an opening scene. Every father does that.

    Grendel 1950

  7. Uneken
    Warning: printf(): Too few arguments in /home/themovie/public_html/wp-content/themes/feed-me-seymour/functions.php on line 694

    In one of the night scenes where the cavalry rides along the river, the trees on the bank show up almost white. The only way that would be possible is filming with IR film, in my opinion. Or does some-one have another idea?

    Dan.

    FotoFilmVideo

    Production Services in Spain

  8. southwestern71
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    Can anyone identify the type of rifles used in the film, some of the close up shots show what look like single shot flint lock rifles pre-dating the American Civil War though the story is set post Civil War.

  9. bcoaggiemom09
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    What is the significance of York turning his wine glass upside down and placing it on the table after her toast?

    • Robert Ritchie
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      Toasts could be used to challenge the fortitude of adversaries: often glasses had to be turned upside down after the toast, to prove that they were indeed empty.

  10. bari2525
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    Hey folks!

    I know we’ve HAD this discussion a few times on this board about this film, but I was watching it again the other night, and couldn’t get over how timeless it it.

    OF course, when you’ve seen as many JW/JF films as I have (with multiple viewings of each), you tend to notice things about other JW/JF films as you watch them.

    Fred Kennedy is Trooper Heintz, and gets into a "soldier’s fight" with Col. Yorke’s son, Jeff. Fred was a mainstay in the John Ford Stock Company, and we was the stuntman killed in a freak accident while filming "The Horse Soldiers" 10 years after this film.

    He has a VERY funny exchange with Quincannon (Victor McLaglen) about the names Heinz had called Quincannon and the younger Yorke (which, of course, caused the fight). That alone is worth a repeated viewing. This brings to mind the scene in She Wore A Yellow Ribbon with Quincannon having a fight with several other soldiers trying to take him to the guardhouse.

    Watching JW play this part is fun, and the first pairing of he and the magnificent Maureen O’Hara is nothing short of magical. This was the movie that Herb Yates "forced" JW, Ford, and O’Hara to make before he would green light the making of "The Quiet Man."

    She was (and STILL is) a stunning women. I wish she and JW could have made more movies than the six they did, but that just means we need to cherish the ones they DID make.

    I know several people who find this movie a "lesser" vehicle than Fort Apache or She Wore A Yellow Ribbon, and most don’t realize that thses movies were never intended to be a "Cavalry Trilogy," but that’s how it’s been labeled through the years.

    I would say that it can stand among the best JW ever made, and only gets better with the passing of time.

    Courage is being scared to death – but saddling up anyway. John Wayne

  11. kwilson55
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    I saw a film Called "Wagon Master" Directed by Ford, made in 1950 with Ben Johnson, Ward Bond, Harry Carey Jr. I wondered where was John Wayne? His whole group was there. Is there any story to this? He usually made 2-3 movies a year, Rio Grande was the only one in 1950. Does anyone know why?

  12. veryblessd
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    I’ve checked the credits for both the movie and the actor and he’s not listed in either but I swear the actor that John Wayne keeps from seeing his slaughtered wife is Forrest Tucker! If not, who is it? Thanks!

  13. emenel
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    I have watched this movie a few times, as it has always been a favorite of mine among the classics. I agree with some of the other things mentioned on this board, e.g. the respect portrayed between men and women. (The fact that the way Native Americans are portrayed isn’t exactly politically or historically correct is another matter that I don’t even want to get into here….!)

    There is something about the closing scene that I didn’t quite get. I am usually quite perceptive (!) but being a European I probably don’t know as much about the history of the American Civil War as most Americans do, which is probably my excuse for not quite "getting it".

    – – – – – SPOILER ALERT!!!! – – – – – –

    In the very end, when the troops start parading, Kathleen Yorke reacts to the music with surprise, a big smile and starts to move to the music. Col. Kirby Yorke turns to her and says "Sheridan!"

    I recognize the music, so I do get her reaction.

    I understand the back story about the plantation which was burnt down, and under what circumstances.

    I understand the contempt in Kathleen Yorke’s voice when she refers to "Yankee gold!" …. I do get all of that.

    And I do know who general Sheridan was, of course.

    However, what I didn’t get was why the colonel turned to his wife and exclaimed "Sheridan!" Why exactly did he say that?

    Sorry for being so slow . I would appreciate someone spelling it out for me.

    ”Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus”

  14. curlew-2
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    Is it just me or did there seem to be some sort of tension between the characters of Lt. Colonel Yorke and Captain St. Jacques?

    "I’m not reckless . . . I’m skillful!"

  15. tracy-106
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    TURNER CLASSIC MOVIES AIRS RIO GRANDE IN COLOR!!!

    Tuesday, November 25,2008 12:15 AM

  16. kilocycles
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    After the Regimental Singers finish seranading Kathleen, they march away, singing a somewhat "jaunty" song. Any idea what it was.

    Reason I ask, the same tune is used in the soundtrack of Escape from Fort Bravo (Wm. Holden, 1953), so I’m presuming that it’s a traditional number.

    Any help appreciated.

    jc

  17. MaureenOHaraFan
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    This is probably a dumb qustion, but It been what is the song at the end of the movie called? I been trying to find it, but can not find it. I don’t know the title.

    thanks

  18. bud-steigerwald
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    ImdB is a truly wonderful site. I just wish there were more photos of the players in films, as I have a terrible memory for names.

    I’m trying to find the name of an actor/singer who played in several John Wayne pictures. In one of the films John Ford directed several members of The Sons of the Pioneers sang some songs around a campfire and the actor whose name I’m trying to recall sand "I’ll Take You Home Again Kathleen" for Maureen O’hara.

    I can’t dredge up the man’s name! Very frustrating.

    Thanks

    Bud Steigerwald

  19. pjwoodall1
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    In her commentary O’Hara says Yakima Canutt was driving the wagon from inside, but he’s not listed in the credits. There is a flub regarding the cover(?) over the wagon. It’s open when O’Hara’s driver is killer, but closed when another soldier takes the reins. Or did he close the flap somehow during the wild ride?

  20. knikatnite
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    The soldier that has a fight with Capt. Yorks’s son is named Heinz in the movie. The same actor is named Hunts in She Wore a Yellow Ribbon. Did John Ford have a thing for canned veggies or tomato sauce? LOL

  21. kimpunkrock
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    Victor M.’s character of Sgt. Quincannon is the same character he played in She Wore a Yellow Ribbon…..but John wayne’s character is the same as in Fort Apache…although Victor is also in Fort Apache he plays another character…Ben Johnson’s character is also the same one he played in She wore a yellow ribbon…..I would like to watch these films back to back…

  22. jmarkley21
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    There is a scene near the end of the movie when they are having a formal dinner. There is a toast…and after the toast, they turn their glasses upside down. I have been wanting to know the answer to this for years. Please help. Thanks.

  23. Anonymous
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    This message has been deleted by the poster

  24. smith93
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    Anyone notice the similarities between Rio Grande and Major Dundee? In alot of ways, Peckinpah basically re-worked Fords film using plot elements that were very similar but to a very different effect. For example: The civil war background (although in the past in the former movie and the present in the latter) with the different ideas of who one’s loyalty is owed to as understood by the Norther character versus the Southern character. There is also the mission to illegally cross into mexico to rescue children taken prisoner by raiding Apaches, which can be read in light of contemporary (to each film) events. Look at how a late 40’s early 50’s view of such a military action contrasts with a vietnam era view. And in each movie many of the men carrying out the mission would not have been the first choices to do so: green recruits or mercenaries and traitors. There are even significant scenes of the troops singing in both films.

    I encourage anyone who likes one or the other of these films to watch both side by side and give some feedback about what you though. Pretty interesting, eh?

  25. emailtb-1
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    Anyone know why John Ford decided to use black & white? After all, the previous film in this "cavalry trilogy" was in color.

  26. evangr03
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    I’m desperately looking for the special collector’s edition!I live in Greece and i don’t use credit cards,please somebody help me!!!!!!!

  27. JimLoneWolf
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  28. ygorshump
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    When Maureen O’Hara as Mrs Yorke makes her entrance sitting in the covered wagon she is helped down by a trooper but as she reaches the ground her dress snags on the wagon and she untangles it. Is the dress snagging a goof or part of the action to delay her from seeing John Wayne as he walks up to the wagon to greet her?

    I’ve always wondered.

    "Badges? We ain’t got no badges. I dont have to show you any stinking badges!"

  29. larrybarnes5
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    Which movie did Ken Curtis introduce the song, Tumbling Tumbleweeds in? Rio Grande or the Wagonmaster?

  30. violachild2002
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    I’ve just watched this movie as I wanted to se this scene I thought was in it. It was at night and the cavalry are camped near the Rio Grande and Trooper Jeff Yorke is talking to someone about his life. Is this in Rio Grande or another cavalry movie with Claude Jarman jr?

  31. aartmartin
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    I just wanted to know the offical pronunciation of the movie Rio Grande. I pronounce it like Grande, spanish name, not Grand. What do you think.

    Art

  32. Marokl
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    Having watched "Rio Grande" for the first time recently, it reminded me by way of contrast how rare it is to find such a respectful representation of the male/female relationship in most films of today. The Maureen O’Hara character has deep differences with the John Wayne character, but the two are thoroughly respectful and considerate to each other on the long road to their eventual (and inevitable) reconciliation. Theres is a truly wonderful, mature, and dignified love vastly different from the hormonally addled highjinks of the young we more commonly see in films.

    I continue to be astounded by how deeply many of the older movies honored the complementary bond men and women can sometimes (and perhaps should ideally) have. If "Rio Grande" were made today, the Maureen O’Hara character would have a chip on her shoulder, the John Wayne character would be an obnoxious chauvinist, and the resolution would have her make him a better man by making him more like a woman (the current ideal of behavior and comportment).

    As a testament to an adult, enduring love between equals, "Rio Grande" is right up there with the best of Tracy and Hepburn.

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